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OCR J200 GCSE Media Paper 2 Section B Indicative Content

Morag Larsen | Tuesday November 08, 2016

Categories: GCSE, OCR GCSE

Paper 2 Section B

Q1 – 1 mark

What do you understand by the term ‘clickbait’?

  • Clickbait is online content that is essentially designed to draw in audience members and encourage them to move onto other aspects of the web site. Sometimes Clickbait content is sensationalised or exaggerated.

Q2 – 4 marks

Using examples, explain the historical and current differences between tabloid and broadsheet newspapers. Has the term begun to evolve in its meaning?

Candidates may explore the following ideas:

  • Tabloid and Broadsheet are two different newspaper sizes.
  • Tabloid newspapers were traditionally more informal than broadsheets.
  • Broadsheets had a reputation for being more in-depth, less frivolous and containing weightier topics.
  • Tabloids are entertainment, broadsheets are concerned with information.
  • By 1960, newspapers were becoming to be recognised by their design. 
  • Broadsheets carried a heavy news based agenda and were often presented by way of intense and relentlessly prose-heavy pages. These front covers carried no real self-promotion or advertising graphics. Examples of this would be The Times and The Guardian.
  • The connotation therefore would be that the broadsheet newspapers were more intellectual and sophisticated than their tabloid counterparts.
  • Tabloids have thus often been characterised by sensationalist, headline based, picture driven content, considered less well developed and easier to digest.
  • As times have progressed, the terms tabloid and broadsheet have come to take on different meanings. Where now, a number of newspapers have altered their size and become more compact, the terms have begun to have more specific connotations and the phrase ‘tabloid newspaper’ in particular.
  • Tabloids have become synonymous with softer stories, less formal language and more celebrity based entertainment driven news. 
  • This idea has also attracted connotations of disreputable behaviour, callous invasive stories and tasteless...

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