MediaEdu

Current Resources

Onsite Consultancy

Workshops & CPD

Useful Materials

Gallery

Gallery

Viewing entries from category: Media Theorists

AQA AS & A2 Recommended Media Studies Theorists »

Rob Miller | Sunday August 31, 2014

Categories: A Level, AQA A Level, AQA A2, AQA AS, Hot Entries, Theory, Media Theorists, Understanding Media, Understanding Key Concepts, Understanding Key Skills, Understanding Key Topics

click on image to enlarge

Genre

  • John Fiske – genre as ‘convenience’ for producers and audiences – this means commercial success is underpinned by the conventions of genre in terms of what audiences expect.
  • Robert Stam – there are infinite genres. Basically here, Stam is advancing an A2 concept that there is an argument that genre no longer exists and we do not have to analyse text in terms of genre.
  • Jane Feuer – genre is abstract and becoming harder to identify.
  • ...
[ read full article ] »

OCR AS and A2 Media Studies Theorists »

Rob Miller | Monday January 13, 2014

Categories: A Level, OCR A Level, OCR A2, OCR AS, Theory, Media Theorists, Admin, Staffroom

click on image to enlarge

All exam boards have their ‘favourite’ Media theorists – this resource explores both contemporary and historical theory and the different approaches to studying core AS Media Studies concepts of Narrative, Genre, Representation and Audience. For AS Media Studies pupils/students would only be expected to make limited reference to theorists in both G321 and for TV/Radio Drama at G322/G323 (TV Drama and Representation). This resource is a guide...

[ read full article ] »

WJEC AS and A2 Media Studies Theorists »

Rob Miller | Monday January 13, 2014

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, WJEC A2 Media Studies, WJEC AS, WJEC AS Media Studies, Hot Entries, Theory, Media Theorists

click on image to enlarge

All exam boards have their ‘favourite’ media theorists – this resource explores both contemporary and historical theory and the different approaches to studying core AS Media Studies concepts of Narrative, Genre, Representation and Audience. For AS Media Studies, pupils/students would only be expected to make limited/some reference to theorists at both MS1 and MS2 while at MS4 reference to 2 or 3 three theorists in each essay could be expected...

[ read full article ] »

Film Theory and Language »

Nicole Ponsford | Thursday August 23, 2012

Categories: GCSE, WJEC GCSE, WJEC GCSE Film Studies, A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, WJEC A2 Film Studies, WJEC AS, WJEC AS Film Studies , Film, Film Analysis, Film Language, Key Concepts, Media Language, Theory, Apparatus Theory, Audience Theory, Feminist Theory, Formalist Theory, Genre Theory , Marxist Theory, Media Theorists, Postcolonial Theory, Poststructuralist Theory, Psychoanalytic Theory, Queer Theory, Race Theory, Screen Theory, Social Realist Theory, Structuralist Theory

image

Apparatus Film Theory

‘Apparatus’ is another word for the means in which a specific production is created. In the case of film / cinema, the film projector and the screen. Apparatus Theory is a model of spectatorship and institutions. It argues that cinema is ideological (based on ideas) because the films are created to represent reality. This means that because film is created to illustrate different ideas, everything has meaning - from the camerawork to the editing. It...

[ read full article ] »

Media Theory: Stuart Ewen »

Stephen Hill | Monday July 13, 2009

Categories: Key Concepts, Other Topics, Theory, Media Theorists

KEY FIGURE 8: Stuart Ewen (1940 approx to present)

KEY IDEA: Style is political: visual signifiers encode systems of belief. While these visual codes are often long and complex histories their appropriation by consumer culture often dilutes their ideological potency. The ideological significance of the punk safety pin, example, is diminished when adopted by mass-produced clothing lines; what is left is in Ewen’s terms ‘cultural waste matter’.

KEY TEXT: All Consuming...

[ read full article ] »

Media Theory: Valentin Voloshinov »

Stephen Hill | Monday July 13, 2009

Categories: Key Concepts, Theory, Media Theorists

KEY FIGURE 6: Valentin Voloshinov (1895 to 1936)

KEY IDEA: Language is ideological: it reflects a dynamic system of beliefs or ideas; it is the key to what makes us human and the structure of the social networks we build. Volosinov views the meaning of words as arbitrary yet fluid: changing over time and according to context.

He coins the term ‘multi-accentuality’ to descibe this. Volosinov argues that it is in the interests of the ruling class ot supress this and...

[ read full article ] »

Media Theory: Stuart Hall »

Stephen Hill | Monday July 13, 2009

Categories: Key Concepts, Other Topics, Theory, Media Theorists

KEY FIGURE 7: Stuart Hall (1932 to present)

KEY IDEA: Proponent of audience reception theory, Hall looks at the way in which cultural interaction generates consent for hegemony (a term he borrows from Italian theorist Antonio Gramsci) – the dominant ideology of the ruling class. Hall views audiences as both the producers and consumers of texts: decoding the meaning encoded by the originator of the text. His approach to textual analysis is that the consumer actively...

[ read full article ] »

Media Theory: Ferdinand de Saussure »

Stephen Hill | Monday July 13, 2009

Categories: Key Concepts, Theory, Media Theorists

KEY FIGURE 5: Ferdinand de Saussure  (1857 to 1913)

KEY IDEA: Structuralist approach to semiology; Saussure argues that all signs are double entities made up of the signifier and the signified.

The signifier is the linguistic coding of a concrete object, abstract emotion or physical act.

The signified is that to which the signifier refers to.

The two things are inseparable; however, the relationship is arbitrary: meaning that there is no causal reason why the two are so...

[ read full article ] »

Media Theory: Frederic Engels »

Stephen Hill | Monday July 13, 2009

Categories: Key Concepts, Theory, Media Theorists

KEY FIGURE 4: Frederic Engels (1820 to 1895)

KEY IDEA: Influenced by Hegel and Heraclitus, Engels contribution to the Communist Manifesto is that of ‘Dialectic Materialism’. Change in the economic structure of society works through the dialectic principles of conflict between thesis and antithesis. In his logic the emergence of a synthesis of the two, i.e. a new economic thesis is characteristic of a new phase in history.

KEY TEXT: The Communist Manifesto (1848; Oxford...

[ read full article ] »

Media Theory: Pierre Bourdieu »

Stephen Hill | Monday July 13, 2009

Categories: Key Concepts, Theory, Media Theorists

KEY FIGURE 2: Pierre Bourdieu (1930 to 2002)

KEY IDEA: Social class is constructed by cultural taste; cultural taste is produced by education. Social class facilitates access to education and so cultural order replicates itself. In the process of education, the individual acquires cultural capital, which gives the individual the ability to identify culturally noble activity. Culture evolves through the nomination of new cultural activity as noble by individuals who are highly...

[ read full article ] »

Media Theory: Karl Marx »

Stephen Hill | Monday July 13, 2009

Categories: Key Concepts, Theory, Media Theorists

KEY FIGURE 3: Karl Marx (1818 to 1883)

KEY IDEA: The economy is at the base of society; everything else is determined by it. Under capitalism, the economy is exploitative: serving only the interests of the ruling class (the Bourgeoisie). This inequality will lead to revolution, which will be characterised by the workers (the proletariat) seizing control the means of production and the end of capitalist economic exchange.

KEY TEXT: The Communist Manifesto (1848; Oxford...

[ read full article ] »

Media Theory: Jean Baudrillard »

Stephen Hill | Monday July 13, 2009

Categories: Key Concepts, Theory, Media Theorists

KEY FIGURE 1: Jean Baudrillard (1929 to present)

KEY IDEA: The proliferation of information technology alienates man from real lived social existence, forcing him to enter a new media induced reality known as hyper-reality: hyper-reality is characterised by the collapse of the distinction between the real and the simulated and the predominance of the simulacrum.

KEY TEXT: Symbolic Exchange and Death (1976; 1993 reprint; Sage Publications, London)